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SCAR GSSG - Final Report from Cybercartographic Atlas workshop, May 2002 " /> " />

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FINAL REPORT FROM CYBERCARTOGRAPHIC ATLAS WORKSHOP
OTTAWA, CANADA, 22-24 MAY 2002


Supported by grants from the Canadian Department of Foreign Affairs and International Trade and the Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council of Canada

Executive Summary

A workshop for the Cybercartographic Atlas of Antarctica Project (CAAP) was held at Carleton University in Ottawa from May 22nd-24th 2002. The workshop was chaired by Dr. Fraser Taylor, the Canadian representative to the SCAR WG-GGI. The CAAP was formally adopted as an official WG-GGI project at a meeting of project coordinators in Sienna in July, 2001.

During his introductory remarks, Dr. Taylor, Director of Carleton's Geomatics and Cartographic Research Centre (GCRC), stated that production of the Atlas will be facilitated by building infrastructure and equipment supplied by a $4.5 million dollar Canadian Foundation for Innovation (CFI) grant. The CFI was recently awarded to Carleton's Human Oriented Technology Lab, one of the GCRC’s partners. The GCRC has been successful in obtaining significant development funding that is being used to prepare a major proposal that will be submitted in July 2002 to the Social Science and Humanities Research Council of Canada ’s new program on Initiatives in the New Economy. If successful, a portion of the major funding will be used to develop and produce the CAAP.

The workshop was attended by eight representatives from Argentina, Australia, Canada, China and the United States. The focus of the work was on further developing the concept and content of the CAAP. A number of items were addressed including: development of initial content themes, identification of data sources, establishment of potential standards and methodologies, discussion of technical issues and strategies for gaining broad SCAR support for the proposal.

Initial themes to be considered for development are an examination of ice shelf breakup, national atlases, geodesy in Antarctica, the decline in elephant seal populations and Human activity in Antarctica. A number of potential data sources were identified for use in the CAAP including the Antarctic Master Directory, Antarctic Digital Database and data contributed by National Antarctic Atlas programs. A development approach using standards produced by the Open GIS Consortium, Inc. (www.opengis.org) and ISO Technical Committee 211 (www.isotc211.org) was adopted. This approach is expected to facilitate incorporation of different information infrastructures into the CAAP.

Presentations based on the work carried out will be delivered at XXVII SCAR in Shanghai in July, 2002. Participants thank the Canadian Department of Foreign Affairs and International Trade and the Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council of Canada, Dr. Taylor and his team at thank Carleton University, for making the workshop possible

 

Introduction and background

The term "Cybercartography" was first introduced in 1997 at the International Cartographic Association (ICA) meeting in Stockholm. The idea for a Cybercartographic Atlas of Antarctica first evolved after work on the Cybercartographic Atlas of Latin America had been finalised www.atlaslatinoamerica.org.

The Canadian Committee for Antarctic Research (CCAR) discussed and approved the Antarctic project in 1999. The work was then presented to the Scientific Committee on Antarctic Research’s Working Group on Geodesy and Geographic Information (SCAR WG-GGI) meeting in Tokyo, in July 2000. The project was also presented to the Antarctic Treaty’s Committee for Environmental Protection (CEP) in Amsterdam in September 2000.

The project was formally adopted by WG-GGI at its meeting in Siena, Italy in July 2001. The project work plan included the requirement of holding at least one of meeting, prior to the XXVII SCAR meeting in July 2002, to discuss the project. A workshop in Puerto Madryn, Argentina in November/December 2001 brought together a number of key stakeholders to discuss the conceptualisation and initial design phases of the project. The Ottawa workshop further developed the atlas concept and design by identifying specific elements of the atlas.

Agenda

WEDNESDAY, MAY 22ND, 2002

 

SESSION 1:

Welcome and Opening

Dr. D.R. Fraser Taylor (Canada), director of the Geomatics and Cartographic Research Centre at Carleton University opened the workshop. Dr. Taylor stated that the idea for a Cybercartographic Atlas of Antarctica originated in Argentina. The idea grew out of a large project funded by the Canadian International Development Agency (CIDA) and the Inter American Development Bank. The project was in collaboration with eight Latin American countries, with resulting products on CD-ROM and an on-line Atlas (see www.atlaslatinoamerica.org). The focus was primarily production, capacity building and training. Project participant from the U.S. provided assistance to ensure compliance with the FGDC geospatial metadata standard. From this work stemmed the idea to apply the concept of Cybercartography to Antarctica. Currently in Canada there is a small group interested in the Antarctic Atlas, particularly among scientists interested in comparative research between Canada’s north and Antarctica.

 

Agenda revision and designation of reporters

The agenda was accepted as is, with the stipulation that changes may be made as needed during the course of the workshop. Tracey Lauriault and Brian Eddy of the Geomatics and Cartographic Research Centre were assigned as reporters.

 

Update on The Cybercartographic Atlas of Antarctica Project – developments since the Puerto Madryn workshop

Funding:

Acquiring resources from Canadian sources is difficult for the Antarctic Atlas as Canada’s focus has traditionally been on the North. However, some success has been achieved as the importance of Antarctica to the global community is becoming clear. Funding has been acquired from the following sources:

Partners:

The major collaborative research project outlined in the previous section aims to test the assumption that we can learn from new media. Therefore an alliance with the Department of Psychology has been established to allow for testing of the learning process, and to further develop an understanding of how humans and computers interact. The multidisciplinary Carleton University research team includes:

The Cybercartographic Atlas of Antarctica has formal participation from national and international organizations, including:

Development Approach:

The intention is to develop The Atlas with content that takes advantage of existing sources of data, particularly those created by SCAR programs. The goal is to support the information needs of the various elements of SCAR and the greater Antarctic community.

In technical terms, standards developed by the Open GIS Consortium ( www.opengis.org) and ISO Technical Committee 211 (www.isotc211.org) will be adopted to facilitate interoperability. For legacy systems that do not use a standards model, the Open Geospatial Datastore Interface (OGDI – ogdi.sourceforge.net) conversion middleware will be used to make data accessible.

As stated at the workshop in Puerto Madryn, a hub and node organizational approach will be adopted with nodes such as the U.S. and China and with sub-nodes established in collaboration with partners who have important datasets but do not have sufficient technical infrastructure.

The concept is to enable partners to develop products independently (e.g. U.S. and the Chinese Atlases), but to be able to contribute to the larger Atlas infrastructure. Interoperability will be key, and much research and development will be focused in this area.

It was stated that Centro Nacional Patagonico (Dr. Vergani) in Argentina and the Military Institute in Chile are interested in becoming nodes. Additionally Uruguay, Paraguay and Peru may follow suit.

General Statements:

The general objectives of the meetings were presented as stated on the agenda.

An open discussion was initiated that invited comments on previous statements made or to clarify objectives for the remainder of the workshop.

In general, the following points were made:

  1. involve 3 user groups - scientists, managers, and the general public
  2. to receive a seal of approval
  3. receive advice on content from SCAR expertise.

SESSION 2

Presentation: The Web , cartography and information delivery, Dr. William Cartwright, RMIT University, Melbourne Australia (with additions by Peter Pulsifer, Carleton University)

Dr. W. Cartwright provided an excellent historical overview of the evolution of the workstation and key innovations in the field of multimedia communication. An historical analysis of Web trends reveals a shift towards .com domains and a decline in .gov. This suggest a shift to home use. Another interesting observation is that languages other than English are growing in importance.

Dr. Cartwright provided important and unique examples of Cartography on the Web. For example, information on the Web can be represented using Cartography by creating Web-connectivity maps. Maps are appearing in new media, as decision support tools and in educational or multimedia packages. Digital image collections are also emerging. There are downloadable data files, Information Services with Maps, Global Publishing, on-line GIS, on-line map services and Web Atlases. Some limitations were identified including the problems of Web cartography based on specification originally developed for print. Other current limitations/problems identified were, the lack of exploitation of the power of new media, mental restrictions, and the imposition of the rules of technology. The presentation ended with a series of important questions regarding the projection of real space onto 'visualized' space.

Please see the document title cartwright.pdf for more details.

Mr. Peter Pulsifer added to the presentation by providing a series of content type examples that could potentially be used in a Cybercartographic Atlas of Antarctica.

Please see the document titled pulsifer_cartwright.pdf for more details.

SESSION 3

Presentation: Canada's Oceans Program Activity Tracking (OPAT) System, Darren A. Williams, Senior Advisor, Integrated Management Program, Marine Ecosystems Conservation Branch, Department of Fisheries and Oceans, Government of Canada

Mr. Williams presented information about an operational on-line information system that uses the map as the primary information interface. Formally launched in September 2000, the Oceans Program Activity Tracking (OPAT) System is an interactive mapping and information system designed to track, share and display details on more program activities established under the federal Oceans Act. Using a graphic user interface and linked databases, the system allows program authorities of Fisheries and Oceans Canada to directly convey and edit information on program activities via the internet through the use of electronic forms and on-screen editing capabilities. The system displays these activities in the context of ocean features and uses such as the delineation of marine ecosystem boundaries and the location of submarine telecommunications cables, aquaculture sites, and oil and gas activities in Canada's marine and coastal environments.

Mr. Williams stated that in 1997 Canada was 1st country to pass 'Oceans Act' - a new approach to sustainabley manage Canada's oceans with multiple stakeholders. OPAT is a tool used to manage the department’s 80 programs. OPAT was developed with a 'learning by doing 'approach.

A live demonstration showed how map layers are stored on different servers, the relationship between programs and other themes, and connectivity to other databases (e.g. Statistics Canada). In this distributed model, data accuracy and liability is dependent on the providers of the individual layers. Metadata is provided to allow users to evaluate the data.

For more information on the OPAT System visit www.dfo-mpo.gc.ca/canoceans.

SESSION 4

Roundtable Discussion: Establishment of a proposal framework for The CyberCartographic Atlas of Antarctica to define a presentation template and establish primary, & top level goals of the Atlas

A roundtable discussion was moderated by Mr. Peter Pulsifer. From that discussion a number of useful ideas were produced with respect to defining an initial proposal framework for XXVII SCAR. Key ideas have been organized by category.

Atlas Users:

Potential Content:

Atlas Functionality:

Long term function ideas:

Important points for presentations at XXVII SCAR:

THURSDAY, MAY 23rd, 2002

SESSION 5

Presentation: Climate Variability and Global Warming impact on Antarctic Ecosystem structure and functioning. Dr. Daniel F. Vergani, MSc. Zulma B. Stanganelli, Lic. Juan Carlos Labraga Argentina - Centro Nacional Patagónico (CENPAT-CONICET), Dr. Ludo Holsbeek, Laboratory for Ecotoxicology and Polar Ecology, Belgium Free University Brussels

Dr. D. Vergani presented an excellent historical overview of Argentina’s activities in Antarctica.

Please see the document titled:

vergani_history.pdf

for the details of Dr. Vergani’s presentation.

In his second presentation, Dr. Vergani presented on Climate Variability and Global Warming impacts on the Antarctica Ecosystems. This research is a joint Belgian/Argentine collaboration. The focus of this research is the use of seals as an indicator species, however the potential exists to study other species including the Adelie Penguin. Dr. Vergani presented a video on the research of Penguins, and the basics of the program. Some of these video products are available to the Atlas. Currently, Penguins census data analysis is ongoing.

Please see the document titled:

vergani_impact.pdf

for the details of Dr. Vergani’s presentation.


Additionally, Dr. Vergani et al. submitted a detailed description of how this research might be included as a component of the The Atlas. This report is contained in the document titled:

argentina_belgium_content_proposal.pdf

A lively discussion followed the history presentation. Key discussion points are listed:

Presentation: Geodetic Activities and History of Geodesy in Antarctica Australia. John Manning, Geodesy Group, National Mapping Division, Geoscience Australia

Mr. Manning presented information about the GGI’s GIANT program and the potential to develop an Atlas component based on activity related to geodesy in Antarctica.

Please see the document titled:

manning_giant_program.pdf

for the details of Mr. Manning’s presentation.

Additionally, Mr. Manning submitted a detailed description of how geodesy in Antarctica and the GIANT program in particular can be developed as a component of the The Atlas. This report is contained in the document titled:

manning_geodesy_chapter.pdf

During his presentation, Mr. Manning stated that surveying and geodesy is a fairly complete area that is not overly controversial. However, different theories of tectonic movements provide a base for interesting debate. It was suggested that the various theories could be animated and included in the Atlas, potentially resulting in the generation of interest in the scientific community and general population.

SESSION 6

Presentation: Cybercartographic Atlas of Antarctica, Main Issues and Network Approach. Prof. Dongchen, E., Nengcheng Chen. Chinese Antarctic Center of Surveying and Mapping, Wuhan University , China. (Presented by Peter Pulsifer, Carleton University on behalf of Prof. Dongchen, E.)

Mr. Pulsifer presented two primary topics: Proposed elements of the Atlas and the Technical Approach. The presentation summarized information provided in two papers submitted by Dr. Dongchen and Nengcheng Chen. The papers are titled:

China_GIS of Antarctica based on Network.pdf

China_Cybercartographic Atlas of Antarctica Main Issues.pdf

Please see the document titled:

Dongchen_china_contribution.pdf

for the details of Mr. Pulsifer’s presentation.

Following the presentation, Dr. Dongchen stated that GeoStar is continually under development, at Wuhun University and it is being developed as a commercial system. It is being marketed in China and an English version is under development for the international audience at a very competitive price. The expectation is that the Atlas will be OGC Compliant within 1 year. The Antarctic data are not live yet but a URL will be sent to members of the workshop. The Project and the tool it uses are considered to be very powerful.

Presentation: Information Prospecting. Dr. William Cartwright, RMIT University, Melbourne Australia.

Dr. Cartwright presented a new concept of ‘prospecting maps’ – that is using the map as a means of ‘exploring the data’ with a ‘map metaphor’. He provided some very useful examples of unconventional mapping techniques in this area (e.g. Mapping money transfers between banks, City of News, standing ‘inside’ the interface & exploring the content). A very interesting User Interface was presented, namely the way to access the data is by way of a using the city metaphor whereby key subject areas are neighborhoods and distinguishing characteristics are data sub-themes.

Please see the document titled:

cartwright_data_prospecting.pdf

for the details of Dr. Cartwright’s presentation.

SESSION 6: Part II

Rountable Discussion: Discuss the potential of previously proposed subject areas for inclusion in the Atlas.

A roundtable discussion was moderated by Mr. Peter Pulsifer. From that discussion a number of useful ideas were produced with respect to defining specific subject areas for inclusion in the Shanghai presentation and potentially the Atlas. Key ideas developed are listed.

SESSION 7

Over the lunch break, a model schematic was drafted based on the discussion in Session 6: Part II. Workshop participants interactively designed and modified the Atlas model based on the further discussion. The schematic was modified during the session and a draft copy created. This draft can be found as page 7 in the following document:

shanghai_framework_workshop_draft.pdf

The remainder of the presentation content was discussed slide by slide with elements being added interactively. The resulting presentation is contained in the framework document Shanghai_framework_workshop_draft.pdf. This presentation includes an introduction to the concept of the Atlas, goals of the Atlas, general themes included, methodology, content, data resources, and prototypes of currently proposed projects.

Other issues to consider were identified:

Data infrastructures; currently the discussion was around presenting content and allowing users to download data, however there was some recognition that eventually a distributed infrastructure model will need to be developed.

The interface will require an approach whereby the information can be accessed from many different lenses. Dr. W.Cartwright presented a Doors/Windows of Perception model for the Atlas, namely SCAR has one perception through the lenses of Geoscience, life Sciences and Physical Science while other users may want to look at the information from the lens of education or perhaps a virtual information lens. The Atlas will need many lenses to meet the needs of its 3 targeted user communities (Scientists, Policy Makers and the General Public) as well as SCAR, and other multidisciplinary projects.

SESSION 8

Round Table Discussion: Establishing communication activities before the Shanghai meetings and meeting outcomes.

The group worked on a list of organizations, and key people to keep informed and contact regarding the CyberCartographic Atlas of Antarctica (see Table 1).

There was discussion that an acronym dictionary or glossary should be created for audiences who may not be familiar with SCAR acronyms.

It was suggested that time and funds allowing, a presentation should be made to CCAMLR at their conference in Big Sky Montana in early August.

There was discussion about the new SCAR subject bins and the maintenance of some of the SCAR-WG topic areas. It is expected that some will remain, e.g. GGI may continue under the geoscience bin and perhaps be renamed to Geospatial Information Group {GIG}.

The three key objectives for the presentations on the CyberCartographic Antarctic Atlas work in Shanghai are to:

Table 1. Contacts action list

Org.

Contact

Position

Nationality

Action

Responsible

Notes

COMNAP

Jack Sayers, Hobart

Executive Secretary

Australia

     
 

Bonni Hrycyk

Representative

Canada

Contact

Fraser Taylor

 

SCAR

Peter Clarkson

Executive Secretary

UK

     
 

Robert H.

Rutford

President

U.S.

     
 

Ian Allison

Sea Ice Expert

Australia

Contact

John Manning

 
 

Chris G. Rapley

SCAR Ex. Comm.: Vice President

UK

Contact through Janet Thomson

Fraser Taylor

 
 

Jörn Thiede

Permanent Delegate

Germany

     
 

Dr Roland Schlich

Vice President

France

     
 

Stephen Bigras

Permanent Delegate

Canada

Contact

Fraser Taylor

 
 

Enrique Marschoff

 

Argentina

Keep Informed

Fraser Taylor

 

CCAMLR

Roger Hewitt

Convenor, WG-EMM

U.S.

Keep informed

Peter Pulsifer

 
 

David Ramm

Data Manager

 

Keep informed

Peter Pulsifer

 
 

Tony Pitcher

Science Expert

Canada

Future Contact

 

Fisheries Centre, UBC

SEALS

John Bengtson

SCAR Working Group

 

Keep informed

Working group continuation??

 

BIRDS

Eric Wohler

SCAR Working Group

 

Keep informed

   

ANTEC

Tom James

Science Expert

Canada

Contact

John Manning

Modelling GSC - Sydney, BC

ACE

Ian Goodwin

Antarctic Climate Evolution <www.geo.umass.edu/ace/>

Australia

Contact

John Manning

University of Newcastle, AUS

ITASE

Ian Goodwin

 

Australia

Contact

John Manning

 

ANTIME

Ian Goodwin

 

Australia

Contact

John Manning

 

JCADM

Lee Belbin

AAD

Australia

Continue contact

Peter Pulsifer

Critical to keep informed and involved in process

Antarctic Master Directory

Lee Belbin

AAD

Australia

Continue contact

Peter Pulsifer

 

IAATO

Denise Landau

Office of the Secretariat

U.S.

Contact

Peter Pulsifer

Meeting July 1-5, Cambridge (Janet Thomson will attend for GGI)

Students on Ice

Geoff Greene

Education Sector

Canada

Contact

Peter Pulsifer through Olav Loken

 

GGI

Stefen Vogt

 

Germany

Keep informed

Peter Pulsifer

 

IHO

Ron McNab

Researcher

Canada

Keep informed

Peter Pulsifer/Fraser Taylor

Bathy-metric

FRIDAY, MAY 24th, 2002

SESSION 9

A modification to the agenda was made. In the interest of saving time, Session 10 of the workshop was removed and incorporated into session 9.

The draft notes and presentation were modified and approved by the workshop participants. A final CD-ROM copy of all documents and presentations will be sent to all participants and those people who could not attend.

The meeting was closed, and the remaining participants went on a recreational outing.


Table 2. Action Items (See Table 1 for contact related items)

Task

Responsible

Due by

Reseach available satellite imagery repositories and the potential for their use in the Atlas

Peter Pulsifer

During Atlas production

Investigate the possibility of acquiring a Full set of 1st edition history of Antarctica Books

John Manning

During Atlas production

Investigate possibility of presenting to CCAMLR in early August

Peter Pulsifer

July 2, 2002

Create a dictionary of acronyms

Peter Pulsifer

July 5, 2002

Produce a final draft of presentation and send to workshop participants for review and comment

Peter Pulsifer

July 5, 2002

Present Atlas presentations

Fraser Taylor

July 15-26, 2002

List of Participants with Contact Details

D. R. Fraser Taylor

Carleton University, Canada

fraser_taylor@carleton.ca

Department of Geography & Environmental Studies
Carleton University
1125 Colonel By Drive
Ottawa, Canada
K1S 5B6

Tel: (613) 520-3979

Fax: (613) 520-2395

John Manning

Geoscience Australia, Australia

John.Manning@ga.gov.au

Scrivener Building
Fern Hill Park
Bruce, ACT
2617

Tel: +61 2 6201 4352
Fax: +61 2 6201 4366

E Dongchen

Wuhan University, China

edc1939@public.wh.hb.cn

Chinese Antarctic Center of Surveying and Mapping
Wuhan University
Wuhan, Hubei Province
P.R.CHINA 430072

Tel: +86 27 8787 0227
Fax: +86 27 8787 4530

Daniel F. Vergani

Centro Nacional Patagonico, Argentina

atlas@cenpat.edu.ar

Boulevard Alm. Brown 3500
9120 Puerto Madryn
Chubut Argentina

Tel: 54-2965-451375

Fax: 54-2965-451543

William Cartwright

RMIT University, Australia

william.cartwright@rmit.edu.au

Department of Geospatial Science
RMIT University
GPO Box 2476V
Melbourne Victoria 3001
Australia

Tel:: +61 3 9925 2423

Fax: +61 3 9663 2517

Jerry L. Mullins

US Geological Survey, U.S.A.

jmullins@usgs.gov

Mapping Applications Center
US Geological Survey
12201 Sunrise Valley Drive
521 National Center
Reston, Virginia 20192

Tel: +1 703 648 5144
Fax: +1 703 648 4165

Wayne Pollard

Canadian Committee for Antarctic Research, Canada

pollard@felix.geog.mcgill.ca

Department of Geography
McGill University
805 Sherbrooke St.
MONTREAL, PQ H3A 2K6

Tel: (514) 398-4454

Fax: (514) 398-7437

Olav H. Loken

Canadian Committee for Antarctic Research, Canada

Oloken@sympatico.ca

1170 Bonnie Crescent
Ottawa, ON K2C 1Z5
Canada

Tel: 613-225-4234

Fax: 613-225-4234

Barbara George

Carleton University, Canada

bgeorge@ccs.carleton.ca

Department of Geography & Environmental Studies
Carleton University
1125 Colonel By Drive
Ottawa, Canada
K1S 5B6

Tel: (613) 520-3979

Fax: (613) 520-2395

Peter L. Pulsifer

Carleton University, Canada

pulsifer@magma.ca

Department of Geography & Environmental Studies
Carleton University
1125 Colonel By Drive
Ottawa, Canada
K1S 5B6

Tel: (613) 520-3979

Fax: (613) 520-2395

Darren A. Williams

Department of Fisheries and Oceans, Canada

williamd@dfo-mpo.gc.ca

12E-230, 200 Kent St.
Ottawa, Ontario, CANADA
K1A 0E6

Tel: (613) 991-1287

Fax: (613) 993-6414

Brian Eddy

Carleton University, Canada

Beddy@sprint.ca

Department of Geography & Environmental Studies
Carleton University
1125 Colonel By Drive
Ottawa, Canada
K1S 5B6

Tel: (613) 520-3979

Fax: (613) 520-2395

Tracey P. Lauriault

Carleton University, Canada

tlauriau@cyberus.ca

Department of Geography & Environmental Studies
Carleton University
1125 Colonel By Drive
Ottawa, Canada
K1S 5B6

Tel: (613) 520-3979

Fax: (613) 520-2395

Gabriella Nagy

Carleton University, Canada

nagyg@canada.com

HOT Lab (Human Oriented Technology)
Department of Psychology
Carleton University
1125 Colonel By Drive
Ottawa, Canada
K1S 5B6
 

Li Yu (Lily)

Carleton University, Canada

lily_yuli@yahoo.com

Department of Geography & Environmental Studies
Carleton University
1125 Colonel By Drive
Ottawa, Canada
K1S 5B6

Tel: (613) 520-3979

Fax: (613) 520-2395